• @phenomlab said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    @jac Ok, so they are powerline. Back to the drawing board then, although I don’t understand why the Wifi signal is so poor when you have a booster in place. What is the speed when testing in close proximity to that booster ?

    If I stand next to the booster and run a speed test it’s 200mbps at least mate.




  • That would have probably been a better option than the booster? Same sort of thing I know but this seems to be something new or just a remarketed booster?

  • Global Moderator Guru

    @jac Mmmm - I think that’s a “gimmick”. You could so something similar with an old NetGear Rangemax.

    Essentially, you connect this device to same network, and then configure it. The range is 10x wider than usual, so usually good for between 600-1000m.

    Cheap, not “Heath Robinson”, and would do what you wanted without high cost, or maximum effort.

    I did something similar for a co-worker who shared a house with others. The signal to her room was so weak, I recommended this and it solved all her problems !


  • @phenomlab said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    @jac Mmmm - I think that’s a “gimmick”. You could so something similar with an old NetGear Rangemax.

    Essentially, you connect this device to same network, and then configure it. The range is 10x wider than usual, so usually good for between 600-1000m.

    Cheap, not “Heath Robinson”, and would do what you wanted without high cost, or maximum effort.

    I did something similar for a co-worker who shared a house with others. The signal to her room was so weak, I recommended this and it solved all her problems !

    Thanks for the advice mate, so would you suggest that box along with the booster would solve the issues upstairs?

    Many thanks 👍🏻

  • Global Moderator Guru

    @jac You could probably remove the booster and use a simple powerline from the back of the cable modem - or, if the existing one you have accepts a network cable at both ends of the adapter, you can recycle that.

    At the other end of the line where your current wifi extension is, replace that with the NetGear router. just connect the cable into any of the 4 LAN ports (not the cable port) and it’ll work out of the box (you’ll need to access it though to configure the settings you want). Just remember that you’ll access effectively a new network (as advertised by the NetGear) instead of the default Virgin one. The Virgin internet connection acts as the transport, whilst the NetGear assumes control of devices directly connected to it.

    I’ve done this before numerous times, and it works very well. Above all, it’s incredibly cheap.


  • @phenomlab said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    @jac You could probably remove the booster and use a simple powerline from the back of the cable modem - or, if the existing one you have accepts a network cable at both ends of the adapter, you can recycle that.

    At the other end of the line where your current wifi extension is, replace that with the NetGear router. just connect the cable into any of the 4 LAN ports (not the cable port) and it’ll work out of the box (you’ll need to access it though to configure the settings you want). Just remember that you’ll access effectively a new network (as advertised by the NetGear) instead of the default Virgin one. The Virgin internet connection acts as the transport, whilst the NetGear assumes control of devices directly connected to it.

    I’ve done this before numerous times, and it works very well. Above all, it’s incredibly cheap.

    Sounds complicated 😆😆. I’ll have to buy that box when I can mate and sort it.


  • @jac said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    @phenomlab said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    @jac You could probably remove the booster and use a simple powerline from the back of the cable modem - or, if the existing one you have accepts a network cable at both ends of the adapter, you can recycle that.

    At the other end of the line where your current wifi extension is, replace that with the NetGear router. just connect the cable into any of the 4 LAN ports (not the cable port) and it’ll work out of the box (you’ll need to access it though to configure the settings you want). Just remember that you’ll access effectively a new network (as advertised by the NetGear) instead of the default Virgin one. The Virgin internet connection acts as the transport, whilst the NetGear assumes control of devices directly connected to it.

    I’ve done this before numerous times, and it works very well. Above all, it’s incredibly cheap.

    Sounds complicated 😆😆. I’ll have to buy that box when I can mate and sort it.

    Sorry no mate read it wrong the first time. It sounds simple mate after I’ve read it again!

    Definitely interested in doing this! Looks a great way to resolve the issue as you say 😁.

  • Global Moderator Guru

    @jac 🙂 Keep it super cheap and watch on eBay for a second hand one. You should be able to pick something like this up for less than a tenner these days.


  • @phenomlab said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    @jac 🙂 Keep it super cheap and watch on eBay for a second hand one. You should be able to pick something like this up for less than a tenner these days.

    Great, thanks mate, I look forward to hopefully resolving the issue! 😆


  • @phenomlab said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    @jac Mmmm - I think that’s a “gimmick”. You could so something similar with an old NetGear Rangemax.

    Essentially, you connect this device to same network, and then configure it. The range is 10x wider than usual, so usually good for between 600-1000m.

    Cheap, not “Heath Robinson”, and would do what you wanted without high cost, or maximum effort.

    I did something similar for a co-worker who shared a house with others. The signal to her room was so weak, I recommended this and it solved all her problems !

    Once I get back from my travels I’ll sort this out 😁.


  • @jac said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    You could probably remove the booster and use a simple powerline from the back of the cable modem - or, if the existing one you have accepts a network cable at both ends of the adapter, you can recycle that.

    Would these be in place of the virgin booster then? They get very very hot so I’m hoping to be able to bin it 🤞🏻.


  • @jac said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    @jac said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    You could probably remove the booster and use a simple powerline from the back of the cable modem - or, if the existing one you have accepts a network cable at both ends of the adapter, you can recycle that.

    Would these be in place of the virgin booster then? They get very very hot so I’m hoping to be able to bin it 🤞🏻.

    Sorry I should have explained better, with the two adapers is there any need to still have a virgin media booster plugged in and connected too?

    Many thanks.

  • Global Moderator Guru

    @jac you’d still need the powerline adapters plus a network cable at each end for the router to be able to work, but not the Virgin booster, no.


  • @phenomlab said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    @jac you’d still need the powerline adapters plus a network cable at each end for the router to be able to work, but not the Virgin booster, no.

    Thanks mate, looking forward to sorting this 😁.


  • This is my Speedcheck 🙂

    Business line with fixed ip

    814b0a70-d11c-4fbc-9c03-da0f07ef1ad1-image.png

  • Global Moderator Guru

    @riekmedia Nice ! I get speeds 350Mbps with my line and it’s residential !


  • @phenomlab said in Virgin Media Broadband:

    350Mbps

    I could have 1000Mbits down and 500Mbit up… but what do you need it for at home. For me the upload was important and the fixed ip because of my servers that are at home Synology

  • Global Moderator Guru

    @riekmedia Completely agree. I do work from home though, so the speed definitely helps.


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