• How often do you test your backups ?

  • Global Moderator Guru


  • @phenomlab Yes. But I do not backup stuff as religiously as I should. Cobbler’s children’s shoes kind of deal. Kind of tough to get motivated when only dealing w/a few, rather than thousands, of boxes. Plus, I kind of like to keep my fingers into the cli - cuz if you don’t use it, you loose it.

    That, and being retired, I no longer have unlimited access to the resources I might otherwise like to have, provided someone else is picking up the tab. :emoji: :emoji: :emoju:

    OTOH, things are also lots simpler now. 🙂 🌴 🌴

    P.S.; Yeah, I have a somewhat atypical sense of humor… 🐕


  • @gotwf said in Do you actually test your backups?:

    Yes. But I do not backup stuff as religiously as I should.

    You and me both then 😉 as @phenomlab has had to pick up the pieces so to speak a few times now I really need to make sure I keep everything backed up. I think Mark’s patience may run out next time, I’m like a cat with nine lives and I’ve already lost a few 😉.

  • Global Moderator Guru

    @jac @gotwf provided you have a sensible approach to backups, the cost needn’t spiral out of control - and, neither should the complexity. Most general consumers of data have large amounts of files that are typically static in nature - such as photos etc.

    Clearly, these won’t be changing anytime soon (unless you’re into image editing) so you could arguably leverage a long term archiving solution for that data. This would keep the cost down to a minimum, and then you’d only need golden copies and one duplicate set just in case - and in most cases, you never access the golden copies as they are literally the last bastion if anything goes wrong.

    Where several people fall in their own swords is to attempt to reduce costs further by keeping the backup of their data in the same place as the origin. Sure, you can argue that it’s on a removable hard disk etc, so if your pc crashes, and you lost the disk, you still have that data - great.

    But what if you had damage caused by flooding or fire, or had your pc / laptop and the external disk stolen…

    The correct strategy here is to keep your backups apart from the origin. In most cases, storage in a secure location (off site) or in a cloud based environment is generally the way to go. Storage is cheap these days, but the backup of that same storage can often work out expensive, which is why it’s always a good idea to shop around for the best deals.


  • @phenomlab said in Do you actually test your backups?:

    The correct strategy here is to keep your backups apart from the origin. In most cases, storage in a secure location (off site) or in a cloud based environment is generally the way to go. Storage is cheap these days, but the backup of that same storage can often work out expensive, which is why it’s always a good idea to shop around for the best deals.

    USB drives in the TB’s are pretty reasonable these days. Some even come w/built in mirroring. If something like this would suit capacity needs, then I think I’d prefer to use them like large tape drives of old, Keep rotating on some schedule. Then keep them in a safe deposit box. Maybe encrypt. Would not want to trust cloud providers with all the eggs. 🥚 🥚

    I have stuff mirrored on multiple boxes but if my house burns down I am admittedly screwed.

  • Global Moderator Guru

    @gotwf said in Do you actually test your backups?:

    I have stuff mirrored on multiple boxes but if my house burns down I am admittedly screwed.

    😛 Well, hopefully, that never happens !!

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